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Course Descriptions

Wilderness First Aid

Each topic covered during the 2-day, 16-hour Wilderness First Aid course has a short lesson and a minimum of one scenario or skill to help facilitate the hands-on-application and understanding of the topic presented. This course is fast-pace and loaded with useful information!

Course Outline

Day 1: 8 hours

  • Introductions

  • Wild vs. urban first aid

  • Patient assessment

  • Bleeding management and shock

  • Musculoskeletal Injuries and splinting

  • The potential spinal cord injury and treatment

Day 2: 8 hours

  • Soft tissue injuries

  • Long-term wound care: infection prevention

  • Preventing the predictable

  • Injuries of heat and cold and treatment

  • Lightning emergencies

  • Medical emergencies: Initial response and extended care

Wilderness First Responder

Our 80-hour Wilderness First Responder course is the standard for outdoor leaders, guides, outdoor educators, and anyone who plans to be far off the beaten path, for long periods of time.  The WFR offers a comprehensive understanding of how to handle injury and illness in remote settings while focusing on the types of problems that are most common.  

            The course is taught under the recommended curriculum guidelines of the Wilderness Medical Society following the new National EMS Education Standards.  An integral part of the course presentation is the preparation of the student to be an outdoor leader, with a foundation in understanding why people get hurt and/or sick in the wild and how to prevent it.  The 72-80 hour course uses a blend of lecture, interactive group sessions, skill labs, scenarios, and mock rescues.   The course finishes with both practical and written exams, allowing the student to earn their Wilderness First Responder Certification.  https://thekaneschools.com/courses/wfr/

Course Outline/Topics Covered

The daily course outline will vary due to class scheduling and weather. The topics covered, however, are the same regardless of the above two things. Students are given multiple opportunities to apply their knowledge through scenario-based learning opportunities and in-depth debriefs and analysis.

  • Wild vs. urban response system

  • Team building and communication

  • Patient assessment

  • Airway and breathing emergency response and extended care

  • Bleeding management and shock

  • Musculoskeletal Injuries and improvised splinting

  • Spinal cord injuries 

  • Rescue litter building and carrying

  •  Soft tissue injuries

  • Long-term wound care: infection prevention

  • Preventing the predictable

  • Head trauma

  • Chest trauma

  • Shelter building

  • Injuries of heat and cold and improvised treatment plans

  • Lightning emergencies

  • Bites and stings

  • Aquatic critter and diving emergencies

  • Medical emergencies: Initial response and extended care

  • High altitude emergencies

  • Mass Casualty Incident response and 4 hour-Mock rescue

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